Dota 2’s Johan “N0tail” Sundstein banned on Twitch

Dota 2’s Johan “N0tail” Sundstein banned on Twitch

Johan “n0tail” Sundstein who played on behalf of Team OG in Dota 2 events was prohibited on Twitch on Christmas Day for an unspecified amount of time following a stream. Although there is no clear reason for the ban, audiences argue that derogatory terms could have been part of this restriction.

Sundstein, who is not the most popular streamer but has over 100,000 fans, chose on Christmas Day to start playing Dota 2 on his stream. The two-time World Champion was quite successful in broadcasting, with around 2,500 viewers on average during the stream.

Yet Sundstein’s account was blocked on Twitch shortly after the broadcast. There was no official reason for the ban, nor was the duration of the prohibition revealed. Sundstein is for the first time on the web banned, with a standard first ban lasting 24 hours a week.

The people who watched Sundstein playing the stream with fellow flamenco lovers Wehsing “SingSing” Yuen and Janne “Gorgc” Stefanovski, suggested that the reason behind his ban might have been the use of homophobic language. He used a homophobe expression when he picked up a hero and used the word “sexual” in a derogatory way.

While Twitch or Sundstein has failed to confirm this, it seems to be the logical reason that such language contravene the Twitch guidelines of the community, which prohibited any language which’ promotes, encourages or facilitates discrimination, objection, harassment or violence on the basis of… gender, gender identity and sexual orientation.’ Nonetheless, for many years he was a famous streamer, and this is his first break, so this would seem impossible in any future time.

Like many high-ranking athletes, Sundstein never broadcasts daily on Twitch, opting instead to train together with her staff and participate in big contests. This tactic pays off for him as he has become The International two-time world champions in 2018 and 2019. That had turned him into the financially best-known prize money sports professional ever, earning $6,890,591.79 in his lifetime.